Complete Novel Around The World in Eighty Days

Complete Novel Around The World in Eighty DaysComplete Novel Around The World in Eighty Days – Phileas Fogg, a stern and disciplined man claims that it is possible to go around the world in eighty days. He is challenged to accomplish this feat himself.🌍🙌

In which it is shown that Phileas Fogg gained nothing by his tour around the world, unless it were happiness

Chapter 37 Yes; Phileas Fogg in person.The reader will remember that at five minutes past eight in the evening – about five and twenty hours after the arrival of the travellers in London – Passepartout had been sent by his master to engage the services of the Reverend Samuel Wilson in a certain marriage ceremony, …

In which it is shown that Phileas Fogg gained nothing by his tour around the world, unless it were happiness Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg’s name is once more at a premium on’Change

Chapter 36 It is time to relate what a change took place in English public opinion when it transpired that the real bank-robber, a certain James Strand, had been arrested, on the 17th day of December, at Edinburgh. Three days before, Phileas Fogg had been a criminal, who was being desperately followed up by the …

In which Phileas Fogg’s name is once more at a premium on’Change Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg does not have to repeat his orders to Passepartout twice

Chapter 35 The dwellers in Saville Row would have been surprised, the next day, if they had been told that Phileas Fogg had returned home. His doors and windows were still closed; no appearance of change was visible.After leaving the station, Mr. Fogg gave Passepartout instructions to purchase some provisions, and quietly went to his …

In which Phileas Fogg does not have to repeat his orders to Passepartout twice Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg shows himself equal to the occasion

Chapter 33 An hour after, the Henrietta passed the lighthouse which marks the entrance of the Hudson, turned the point of Sandy Hook, and put to sea. During the day she skirted Long Island, passed Fire Island, and directed her course rapidly eastward.At noon the next day, a man mounted the bridge to ascertain the …

In which Phileas Fogg shows himself equal to the occasion Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg engages in a direct struggle with bad fortune

Chapter 32 The China, in leaving, seemed to have carried off Phileas Fogg’s last hope. None of the other steamers were able to serve his projects. The Pereire, of the French Transatlantic Company, whose admirable steamers are equal to any in speed and comfort, did not leave until the 14th; the Hamburg boats did not …

In which Phileas Fogg engages in a direct struggle with bad fortune Read More »

In which Fix, the detective, considerably furthers the interests of Phileas Fogg

Chapter 31 Phileas Fogg found himself twenty hours behind time. Passepartout, the involuntary cause of this delay, was desperate. He had ruined his master!At this moment the detective approached Mr. Fogg, and, looking him intently in the face, said:“Seriously, sir, are you in great haste?”“Quite seriously.”“I have a purpose in asking,” resumed Fix. “Is it …

In which Fix, the detective, considerably furthers the interests of Phileas Fogg Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg simply does his duty

Chapter 30 Three passengers – including Passepartout – had disappeared. Had they been killed in the struggle? Were they taken prisoners by the Sioux? It was impossible to tell.There were many wounded, but none mortally. Colonel Proctor was one of the most seriously hurt; he had fought bravely, and a ball had entered his groin. …

In which Phileas Fogg simply does his duty Read More »

In which certain incidents are narrated which are only to be met with on American railroads

Chapter 29 The train pursued its course, that evening without interruption, passing Fort Saunders, crossing Cheyenne Pass, and reaching Evans Pass. The road here attained the highest elevation of the journey, eight thousand and ninety-one feet above the level of the sea. The travellers had now only to descend to the Atlantic by limitless plains, …

In which certain incidents are narrated which are only to be met with on American railroads Read More »

In which Passepartout does not succeed in making anybody listen to reason

Chapter 28 The train, on leaving Great Salt Lake at Ogden, passed northward for an hour as far as Weber River, having completed nearly nine hundred miles from San Francisco. From this point it took an easterly direction towards the jagged Wahsatch Mountains. It was in the section included between this range and the Rocky …

In which Passepartout does not succeed in making anybody listen to reason Read More »

In which Passepartout undergoes, at a speed of twenty miles an hour, a course of Mormon history

Chapter 27 During the night of the 5th of December, the train ran south-easterly for about fifty miles; then rose an equal distance in a north-easterly direction, towards the Great Salt Lake.Passepartout, about nine o’clock, went out upon the platform to take the air. The weather was cold, the heavens gray, but it was not …

In which Passepartout undergoes, at a speed of twenty miles an hour, a course of Mormon history Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg and party travel by the Pacific Railroad

Chapter 26 From ocean to ocean – so say the Americans; and these four words compose the general designation of the “great trunk line” which crosses the entire width of the United States. The Pacific Railroad is, however, really divided into two distinct lines: the Central Pacific, between San Francisco and Ogden, and the Union …

In which Phileas Fogg and party travel by the Pacific Railroad Read More »

In which a slight glimpse is had of San Francisco

Chapter 25 It was seven in the morning when Mr. Fogg, Aouda, and Passepartout set foot upon the American continent, if this name can be given to the floating quay upon which they disembarked. These quays, rising and falling with the tide, thus facilitate the loading and unloading of vessels. Alongside them were clippers of …

In which a slight glimpse is had of San Francisco Read More »

During which Mr. Fogg and party cross the pacific ocean

Chapter 24 What happened when the pilot-boat came in sight of Shanghai will be easily guessed. The signals made by the Tankadere had been seen by the captain of the Yokohama steamer, who, espying the flag at half-mast, had directed his course towards the little craft. Phileas Fogg, after paying the stipulated price of his …

During which Mr. Fogg and party cross the pacific ocean Read More »

In which Passepartout’s nose becomes outrageously long

Chapter 23 The next morning poor, jaded, famished Passepartout said to himself that he must get something to eat at all hazards, and the sooner he did so the better. He might, indeed, sell his watch; but he would have starved first.Now or never he must use the strong, if not melodious voice which nature …

In which Passepartout’s nose becomes outrageously long Read More »

In which Passepartout finds out that, even at the antipodes, it is convenient to have some money in one’s pocket

Chapter 22 The Carnatic, setting sail from Hong Kong at half-past six on the 7th of November, directed her course at full steam towards Japan. She carried a large cargo and a well-filled cabin of passengers. Two state-rooms in the rear were, however, unoccupied – those which had been engaged by Phileas Fogg.The next day …

In which Passepartout finds out that, even at the antipodes, it is convenient to have some money in one’s pocket Read More »

In which the master of the ‘Tankadere’ runs great risk of losing a reward of two hundred pounds

Chapter 21 This voyage of eight hundred miles was a perilous venture on a craft of twenty tons, and at that season of the year. The Chinese seas are usually boisterous, subject to terrible gales of wind, and especially during the equinoxes; and it was now early November.It would clearly have been to the master’s …

In which the master of the ‘Tankadere’ runs great risk of losing a reward of two hundred pounds Read More »

In which Fix comes face to face with Phileas Fogg

Chapter 20 While these events were passing at the opium-house Mr. Fogg, unconscious of the danger he was in of losing the steamer, was quietly escorting Aouda about the streets of the English quarter, making the necessary purchases for the long voyage before them. It was all very well for an Englishman like Mr. Fogg …

In which Fix comes face to face with Phileas Fogg Read More »

In which Passepartout takes a too great interest in his master, and what comes of it

Chapter 19 Hong Kong is an island which came into the possession of the English by the treaty of Nankin, after the war of 1842; and the colonizing genius of the English has created upon it an important city and an excellent port. The island is situated at the mouth of the Canton River and …

In which Passepartout takes a too great interest in his master, and what comes of it Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg, Passepartout, and Fix go each about his business

Chapter 18 The weather was bad during the latter days of the voyage. The wind, obstinately remaining in the north-west, blew a gale, and retarded the steamer. The Rangoon rolled heavily, and the passengers became impatient of the long, monstrous waves which the wind raised before their path. A sort of tempest arose on the …

In which Phileas Fogg, Passepartout, and Fix go each about his business Read More »

Showing what happened on the voyage from Singapore to Hong Kong

Chapter 17 The detective and Passepartout met often on deck after this interview, though Fix was reserved, and did not attempt to induce his companion to divulge any more facts concerning Mr. Fogg. He caught a glimpse of that mysterious gentleman once or twice, but Mr. Fogg usually confined himself to the cabin, where he …

Showing what happened on the voyage from Singapore to Hong Kong Read More »

In which Fix does not seem to understand in the least what is said to him

Chapter 16 The Rangoon – one of the Peninsular and Oriental Company’s boats plying in the Chinese and Japanese seas – was a screw steamer, built of iron, weighing about seventeen hundred and seventy tons, and with engines of four hundred horse-power. She was as fast, but not as well fitted up, as the Mongolia, …

In which Fix does not seem to understand in the least what is said to him Read More »

In which the bag of banknotes disgorges some thousands of pounds more

Chapter 15 The train entered the station, and Passepartout, jumping out first, was followed by Mr. Fogg, who assisted his fair companion to descend. Phileas Fogg intended to proceed at once to the Hong Kong steamer, in order to get Aouda comfortably settled for the voyage. He was unwilling to leave her while they were …

In which the bag of banknotes disgorges some thousands of pounds more Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg descends the whole length of the beautiful valley of the Ganges without ever thinking of seeing it

Chapter 14 The rash exploit had been accomplished; and for an hour Passepartout laughed gaily at his success. Sir Francis pressed the worthy fellow’s hand, and his master said, “Well done!” which, from him, was high commendation; to which Passepartout replied that all the credit of the affair belonged to Mr. Fogg. As for him, …

In which Phileas Fogg descends the whole length of the beautiful valley of the Ganges without ever thinking of seeing it Read More »

In which Passepartout receives a new proof that fortune favours the brave

Chapter 13 The project was a bold one, full of difficulty, perhaps impracticable. Mr. Fogg was going to risk life, or at least liberty, and therefore the success of his tour. But he did not hesitate, and he found in Sir Francis Cromarty an enthusiastic ally.As for Passepartout, he was ready for anything that might …

In which Passepartout receives a new proof that fortune favours the brave Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg and his companions venture across the Indian forests, and what ensued

Chapter 12 In order to shorten the journey, the guide passed to the left of the line where the railway was still in process of being built. This line, owing to the capricious turnings of the Vindhia Mountains, did not pursue a straight course. The Parsee, who was quite familiar with the roads and paths …

In which Phileas Fogg and his companions venture across the Indian forests, and what ensued Read More »

In which Phileas Fogg secures a curious means of conveyance at a fabulous price

Chapter 11 The train had started punctually. Among the passengers were a number of officers, Government officials, and opium and indigo merchants, whose business called them to the eastern coast. Passepartout rode in the same carriage with his master, and a third passenger occupied a seat opposite to them. This was Sir Francis Cromarty, one …

In which Phileas Fogg secures a curious means of conveyance at a fabulous price Read More »

In which Passepartout is only too glad to get off with the loss of his shoes

Chapter 10 Everybody knows that the great reversed triangle of land, with its base in the north and its apex in the south, which is called India, embraces fourteen hundred thousand square miles, upon which is spread unequally a population of one hundredand eighty millions of souls. The British Crown exercises areal and despotic dominion …

In which Passepartout is only too glad to get off with the loss of his shoes Read More »

In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean prove propitious to the designs of Phileas Fogg

Chapter 9 The distance between Suez and Aden is precisely thirteen hundred and ten miles, and the regulations of the company allow the steamers one hundred and thirty-eight hours in which to traverse it. The Mongolia, thanks to the vigorous exertions of the engineer, seemed likely, so rapid was her speed, to reach her destination …

In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean prove propitious to the designs of Phileas Fogg Read More »

In which Passepartout talks rather more, perhaps, than is prudent

Chapter 8 Fix soon rejoined Passepartout, who was lounging and looking about on the quay, as if he did not feel that he, at least, was obliged not to see anything.“Well, my friend,” said the detective, coming up with him, “is your passport visaed?”“Ah, it’s you, is it, monsieur?” responded Passepartout. “Thanks, yes, the passport …

In which Passepartout talks rather more, perhaps, than is prudent Read More »

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